Federico Ramallo

Apr 27, 2024

Streamlining Observability and OpenTelemetry

Federico Ramallo

Apr 27, 2024

Streamlining Observability and OpenTelemetry

Federico Ramallo

Apr 27, 2024

Streamlining Observability and OpenTelemetry

Federico Ramallo

Apr 27, 2024

Streamlining Observability and OpenTelemetry

Federico Ramallo

Apr 27, 2024

Streamlining Observability and OpenTelemetry

Streamlining Observability and OpenTelemetry

At Developer Week 2024, Greg Leffler, an expert from Splunk with a rich background in systems operations at eBay and LinkedIn, shared his insights on streamlining observability and OpenTelemetry efforts. His talk, targeted at developers and SREs, was informative and a call to action for better observability practices in the tech industry.

Observability, as Greg defined it, is the ability to understand what's happening inside our systems by looking at the output they produce. It's more than just collecting metrics, logs, and traces; it's about making sense of this data to improve system performance and reliability. Greg emphasized that while metrics, logs, and traces are essential, they alone do not constitute observability.

One of the session's core themes was the significance of observability in modern software development. Having a deep understanding of system performance and being able to quickly identify and solve problems is crucial. Greg highlighted how observability could lead to proactive problem-solving, rather than reactive, enhancing user satisfaction and system reliability.

Greg also introduced OpenTelemetry, a set of APIs, libraries, and agents that collect telemetry data for cloud-native software. He explained its importance in achieving effective observability, making it easier for developers to send data to the observability tools they use. He shared strategies to convince stakeholders of the value of investing in observability, emphasizing its long-term benefits, including reduced downtime and better decision-making based on insights from system data.

A significant part of his talk was dedicated to demonstrating how observability works in practice, using Splunk as an example. This demonstration showed how observability tools could integrate various data types into a cohesive view, allowing for faster and more efficient problem-solving.


What are your thoughts on implementing observability and OpenTelemetry in your projects?
Have you experienced the benefits first-hand, or are you facing challenges in convincing your team of its importance?

Let's discuss below how we can make observability a standard practice in our development efforts.


Streamlining Observability and OpenTelemetry

At Developer Week 2024, Greg Leffler, an expert from Splunk with a rich background in systems operations at eBay and LinkedIn, shared his insights on streamlining observability and OpenTelemetry efforts. His talk, targeted at developers and SREs, was informative and a call to action for better observability practices in the tech industry.

Observability, as Greg defined it, is the ability to understand what's happening inside our systems by looking at the output they produce. It's more than just collecting metrics, logs, and traces; it's about making sense of this data to improve system performance and reliability. Greg emphasized that while metrics, logs, and traces are essential, they alone do not constitute observability.

One of the session's core themes was the significance of observability in modern software development. Having a deep understanding of system performance and being able to quickly identify and solve problems is crucial. Greg highlighted how observability could lead to proactive problem-solving, rather than reactive, enhancing user satisfaction and system reliability.

Greg also introduced OpenTelemetry, a set of APIs, libraries, and agents that collect telemetry data for cloud-native software. He explained its importance in achieving effective observability, making it easier for developers to send data to the observability tools they use. He shared strategies to convince stakeholders of the value of investing in observability, emphasizing its long-term benefits, including reduced downtime and better decision-making based on insights from system data.

A significant part of his talk was dedicated to demonstrating how observability works in practice, using Splunk as an example. This demonstration showed how observability tools could integrate various data types into a cohesive view, allowing for faster and more efficient problem-solving.


What are your thoughts on implementing observability and OpenTelemetry in your projects?
Have you experienced the benefits first-hand, or are you facing challenges in convincing your team of its importance?

Let's discuss below how we can make observability a standard practice in our development efforts.


Streamlining Observability and OpenTelemetry

At Developer Week 2024, Greg Leffler, an expert from Splunk with a rich background in systems operations at eBay and LinkedIn, shared his insights on streamlining observability and OpenTelemetry efforts. His talk, targeted at developers and SREs, was informative and a call to action for better observability practices in the tech industry.

Observability, as Greg defined it, is the ability to understand what's happening inside our systems by looking at the output they produce. It's more than just collecting metrics, logs, and traces; it's about making sense of this data to improve system performance and reliability. Greg emphasized that while metrics, logs, and traces are essential, they alone do not constitute observability.

One of the session's core themes was the significance of observability in modern software development. Having a deep understanding of system performance and being able to quickly identify and solve problems is crucial. Greg highlighted how observability could lead to proactive problem-solving, rather than reactive, enhancing user satisfaction and system reliability.

Greg also introduced OpenTelemetry, a set of APIs, libraries, and agents that collect telemetry data for cloud-native software. He explained its importance in achieving effective observability, making it easier for developers to send data to the observability tools they use. He shared strategies to convince stakeholders of the value of investing in observability, emphasizing its long-term benefits, including reduced downtime and better decision-making based on insights from system data.

A significant part of his talk was dedicated to demonstrating how observability works in practice, using Splunk as an example. This demonstration showed how observability tools could integrate various data types into a cohesive view, allowing for faster and more efficient problem-solving.


What are your thoughts on implementing observability and OpenTelemetry in your projects?
Have you experienced the benefits first-hand, or are you facing challenges in convincing your team of its importance?

Let's discuss below how we can make observability a standard practice in our development efforts.


Streamlining Observability and OpenTelemetry

At Developer Week 2024, Greg Leffler, an expert from Splunk with a rich background in systems operations at eBay and LinkedIn, shared his insights on streamlining observability and OpenTelemetry efforts. His talk, targeted at developers and SREs, was informative and a call to action for better observability practices in the tech industry.

Observability, as Greg defined it, is the ability to understand what's happening inside our systems by looking at the output they produce. It's more than just collecting metrics, logs, and traces; it's about making sense of this data to improve system performance and reliability. Greg emphasized that while metrics, logs, and traces are essential, they alone do not constitute observability.

One of the session's core themes was the significance of observability in modern software development. Having a deep understanding of system performance and being able to quickly identify and solve problems is crucial. Greg highlighted how observability could lead to proactive problem-solving, rather than reactive, enhancing user satisfaction and system reliability.

Greg also introduced OpenTelemetry, a set of APIs, libraries, and agents that collect telemetry data for cloud-native software. He explained its importance in achieving effective observability, making it easier for developers to send data to the observability tools they use. He shared strategies to convince stakeholders of the value of investing in observability, emphasizing its long-term benefits, including reduced downtime and better decision-making based on insights from system data.

A significant part of his talk was dedicated to demonstrating how observability works in practice, using Splunk as an example. This demonstration showed how observability tools could integrate various data types into a cohesive view, allowing for faster and more efficient problem-solving.


What are your thoughts on implementing observability and OpenTelemetry in your projects?
Have you experienced the benefits first-hand, or are you facing challenges in convincing your team of its importance?

Let's discuss below how we can make observability a standard practice in our development efforts.


Streamlining Observability and OpenTelemetry

At Developer Week 2024, Greg Leffler, an expert from Splunk with a rich background in systems operations at eBay and LinkedIn, shared his insights on streamlining observability and OpenTelemetry efforts. His talk, targeted at developers and SREs, was informative and a call to action for better observability practices in the tech industry.

Observability, as Greg defined it, is the ability to understand what's happening inside our systems by looking at the output they produce. It's more than just collecting metrics, logs, and traces; it's about making sense of this data to improve system performance and reliability. Greg emphasized that while metrics, logs, and traces are essential, they alone do not constitute observability.

One of the session's core themes was the significance of observability in modern software development. Having a deep understanding of system performance and being able to quickly identify and solve problems is crucial. Greg highlighted how observability could lead to proactive problem-solving, rather than reactive, enhancing user satisfaction and system reliability.

Greg also introduced OpenTelemetry, a set of APIs, libraries, and agents that collect telemetry data for cloud-native software. He explained its importance in achieving effective observability, making it easier for developers to send data to the observability tools they use. He shared strategies to convince stakeholders of the value of investing in observability, emphasizing its long-term benefits, including reduced downtime and better decision-making based on insights from system data.

A significant part of his talk was dedicated to demonstrating how observability works in practice, using Splunk as an example. This demonstration showed how observability tools could integrate various data types into a cohesive view, allowing for faster and more efficient problem-solving.


What are your thoughts on implementing observability and OpenTelemetry in your projects?
Have you experienced the benefits first-hand, or are you facing challenges in convincing your team of its importance?

Let's discuss below how we can make observability a standard practice in our development efforts.


Guadalajara

Werkshop - Av. Acueducto 6050, Lomas del bosque, Plaza Acueducto. 45116,

Zapopan, Jalisco. México.

Texas
17350 State Hwy 249, Ste 220 #20807,

Houston, Texas 77064 US.

© Density Labs. All Right reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of Use.

Guadalajara

Werkshop - Av. Acueducto 6050, Lomas del bosque, Plaza Acueducto. 45116,

Zapopan, Jalisco. México.

Texas
17350 State Hwy 249, Ste 220 #20807,

Houston, Texas 77064 US.

© Density Labs. All Right reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of Use.

Guadalajara

Werkshop - Av. Acueducto 6050, Lomas del bosque, Plaza Acueducto. 45116,

Zapopan, Jalisco. México.

Texas
17350 State Hwy 249, Ste 220 #20807,

Houston, Texas 77064 US.

© Density Labs. All Right reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of Use.